Facial Plastic Surgery Blog

In summary: Chin implant complications are rare, but there are a few risks to know about before proceeding with a chin implant. Learn more about the potential issues of chin implants.

Chin augmentation with implant is a very safe surgery. But there are a few risks to discuss before surgery.

The first risk is infection. To help prevent this complication, meticulous and sterile techniques are used to place the implant. Even with that, an infection can occur. We always use IV antibiotics during surgery and soak the implant in an antibiotic solution. Oral antibiotics are used after surgery for a week also. If an infection does occur the possible symptoms can include redness, pain, a draining wound, and fever. If you have any of these symptoms you must consult your physician immediately.

The second thing we worry about is displacement of the implant. This mainly happens after trauma. Within a week of placing he implant there is a nice shell (or capsule) of scar tissue holding it in place. But still with a significant impact injury the implant can move. The general rule of thumb is that an implant placed through a chin incision has the potential to move downward, while an implant placed intraorally can potentially move upward. Please note these scenarios are rare.

There can also be injury to the mental nerve, which provides sensation to the chin and lower lip area. This nerve is typically stretched during implant pocket creation and placement. Almost always the numbness is temporary on the order of days to a few weeks. Rarely it can last a few months and even more rarely it can be permanent.

Chin augmentation with implant is a very safe surgery. But there are a few risks to discuss before surgery.

First is infection. To help prevent this complication, meticulous and sterile techniques are used to place the implant. But even with that, an infection can occur. So we always used IV antibiotics during surgery and soak the implant in an antibiotic solution. Oral antibiotics are used after surgery for a week also. If an infection does occur the possible symptoms can include redness, pain, a weaping or draining wound, fluctuance and fever. If you have any of these symptoms you must consult your physician immediately.

The second thing we worry about is displacement of the implant. This mainly happens after trauma. Within a week of placing he implant there is a nice shell (or capsule) of scar tissue holding it in place. But still with a significant impact injury the implant can move. The general rule of thumb is that an implant placed through a chin incision has the potential to move downward, while an implant placed intraorally can potentially move upward. Most importantly however is that both of these are rare.

There can also be injury to the mental nerve, which provides sensation to the chin and lower lip area. This nerve is typically stretched during implant pocket creation and placement. Almost always the numbness is temporary on the order of days to a few weeks. Rarely it can last a few months and even more rarely it can be permanent.

Finally, patients might not like the way it appears. They might think it’s too small, too big or they might just not like the look. We have an imaging program to provide realistic goals for surgery, so our patients are prepared for the final outcome. However even with that there is a risk that the patient doesn’t like it.

I hope that helps you understand chin implants and their potential risks. While these risks are present, they are all very rare. If you have any other questions about chin implants, check our our website at drundavia.com or email us at info@drundavia.com.

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